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Mrs. Rainer's

NO SCHOOL ON MONDAY,

January 20 in observance

of Martin Luther King


WELCOME BACK!!

We are so happy to have Mr. Matthew Beasley with us this semester. I hope you all took time to read his introductory letter that was sent home in your child's binder on Thursday. Matthew is in his last semester at MSU to become a licensed teacher. The children are really enjoying having him in our class. He has shown a great interest in the education of your child. 


Please listen to your child read weekly story, 1 minute timed reading racer, and 1 minute time sight words.

Thank you so much for all you do with your child.

Mrs. Rainer

 

                                Spelling

far    much    play    gave     upon

after     handy     dribble    spell   shapeless

*says     *should

*High frequency words that cannot be sounded out to spell. These words have to be memorized.

Six friends came to my slumber party. We stayed up until three. Mom made plum tarts for us. The sweet crust was tender and good.

*Parents, we are trying to get the children to understand about writing in paragraph form. Please have them write their sentences the same way it is written above.


Story of the Week

I'm a Caterpillar

pages 158-174

by Jean Marzollo

illustrated by Judith Moffat

(blue hardback reader)

Skill(s) for the week: pages 152-156

Vowels:  r - controlled er, ir, ur
dark  starts   March    park   tar
her    girl    shirt   germs   hurt

High Frequency Words
know  push   done    wait    visit  

Reading Racer and Sight words

Week 5- How Does It Grow?
Children need to be reading 82 words per minute without errors by May to be successful in 2nd grade.

Language:

"Be" verbs- am, is, are, was, were

The words am, is, and are tell about now.

The words was and were tell about the past.

Text Features:
Captions and Pictures
A caption tells about the picture
See page 177 in your child's reader for better understanding.

Great Educational Sites:



Week of January 21-24, 2019
Ready Reading
Unit 3 Lesson 10
Sensory Words


Standard: RL.1.4 Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that appeal to the senses.

Revisiting- Mike Mulligan and His Steam Engine


Lesson Objectives:
Identify sensory words and phrases used to describe details in a poem. 
Identify sensory words and phrases used to describe details in a story.
Understand how sensory words help readers picture what is happening in text.

Author's use of sensory words to describe story details. Sensory words tell how things look, sound, smell, taste, or feel.


Saxon Phonics
Saxon Phonics
Long and Short Vowel Ee
Rule: When a vowel is followed by a consonant and sneaky e the vowel is long and we mark out 
sneaky e. 

Lessons 91-Spelling with Diphthong oi/oy
Lesson 92- Vowel Rule  vc/cvc/cv
Lesson 93-Final, Stable Syllable- tion
Lesson 94- Digraph ue
Lesson 95 Assessment


PLEASE!  PLEASE!
Go over these rules each night with your child and make sure they can apply them when coding words.

1) A vowel followed by a consonant is short, code it with a breve (smile).
These are examples known as cvc words:
 dog  cat
                                           cvc    cvc-
cvc- consonant   vowel   consonant

  2) An open, accented vowel is long, code it with a macron (short, straight line above vowel).
These are examples known as cv words:
go    no    so    he    she    hi
                          cv    cv     cv    cv    cv      cv 

cv- consonant  vowel

Spelling Rule:
is followed by a, o, and u
is followed by i, e and y

Long Vowel Rule: When a vowel is followed by a consonant and sneaky e the vowel is long and we mark out 
sneaky e. 

*Doubling Rule:When you have a one syllable word that ends with one vowel and one consonant double the consonant before adding a vowel suffix.
Example: hop    hopping
*Dropping Rule:When you have a one syllable word that ends with an e, drop the e before adding a vowel suffix.
Example: make    making 

Vowel Suffixes : ed, ing, es, er, y

Look at your child's phonics papers to better understand coding. This will get more difficult as the year progresses. 

 Topic 8 Understand Place Value
Tuesday:  8-1 Make Numbers 11 to 19
Wednesday: 8-2 Numbers made with Tens
Thursday: 8-3 Count with Groups of Tens and Leftovers


1.NBT.B.2a, 2b, 2c

Understand that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones. Understand the following as special cases:
a. 10 can be throught of as a bundel of ten ones-called a 'ten'.
b. The numbers from 11 to 19 are composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.
c. The numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine tens (and 0 ones)




























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